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Posts tagged ‘churches’

Liverpool’s decline, it’s resurgence and it’s celebration

Some of Liverpool’s most fascinating history comes out of its darkest days, and to look back on it summons feelings of fascination, astonishment, but maybe even a little nostalgia for ‘simpler’ times. The links in this edition of the blog cover those times, as well as the vibrant history community that is alive and well on the web today. Read more

The Ancient Crosses of Lancashire

Happy New Year all! This year I’ll be concentrating on more maps of Liverpool and the surrounding area, with only a smattering of news when it suits. First up: a lovely little book from 1902, detailing one man’s niche interest…

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Churches, and Rural Landscapes in Urban Liverpool

This article was inspired by Celia Heritage’s recent article on parish churches. Her love of churches, in terms of history, began through researching family history and looking for ancestors’ gravestones.

What to look out for in a parish church

What to Look Out For in a Parish Church is the first article on the revamped Celia’s Blog. The article is a really interesting run-through of the oft-missed aspects of church architecture and archaeology and those features which any observant onlooker can spot.
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Medieval church of All Saint’s, Childwall, to get new extension

Proposals for new developments at Childwall’s All Saint’s church look set to get planning permission. The plans are labelled ‘controversial’ by the Liverpool Echo.

All Saint’s is Liverpool’s oldest surviving church – parts date to the Medieval period – although the only parts of the building which will be knocked through are more modern sections of wall. In addition to this around 180 bodies may need to be exhumed and moved to theĀ  Bloodstained Acre, land to the north never before built upon. Read more

English Heritage produce advice on caring for places of worship

Interior of the bombed-out church at the top of Bold Street, Liverpool

Bombed-out Church, by Litlnemo via Flickr

English Heritage are currently building up their catalogue of advice for those involved in the care of historic buildings. The latest guides concern places of worship.

EH’s first ever sample survey of England’s 14,500 listed places of worship, suggests that some 90% are in a good or fair condition but 10% are potentially in need of urgent repairs. In response to this research, English Heritage has produced a practical guide, DVD and website: www.english-heritage.org.uk/powar.

On this page are also links to case studies, so you can see what others in similar roles have done.